Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Turistificação de Lisboa: O Turista, o "cidadão principal" da cidade?



Em vez das vozes dos nossos vizinhos (cada vez mais a desaparecer dos nossos bairros historicos) ouvimos o barulho das rodinhas destas bagagens. Parece que se decidiu (quem?) que estes passam a ser o "cidadão principal" da cidade. Abram alas para deixar entrar o Exmo. Turista e mais os seus dollars & euros! A agonia da turistificação do centro histórico de Lisboa... o Turista, o "cidadão principal" da cidade?

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Airbnb to be legalised in London

New rules announced this week mean Londoners will soon be able to rent their homes on sites such as Airbnb without the risk of fines
Londoners will soon be able to legally let their homes through websites such asAirbnb, thanks to an amendment to the capital’s housing legislation currently going through parliament.
There are already thousands of homes in the capital advertised for short-term holiday lets, but technically the practice is illegal and residents face fines of up to £20,000 for failing to secure planning permission before doing so.
The decision to update the London-only law, announced on Monday, ends years of confusion over the practice. In a written statement, housing minister Brandon Lewis criticised the current legislation for being “outdated” and “inconsistently enforced”.
“We want to update these laws to help boost the sharing economy, in light of the popularity of websites like Airbnb and Onefinestay, to help people rent out their property on a short-term basis.” he said.
“It will provide income to householders who want to rent out their home – for example, if they themselves go on holiday.”
Under the updated law, homeowners will be able to let out their house, flat or spare rooms for up to three months a year.
The move was praised by Airbnb, who said the reforms will help locals meet the cost of living in one of the most expensive cities in the world. According to the site, which has hosted over 30 million guests since it launched in 2008, many UK hosts work in the creative industries and more than 40% are self-employed, freelance or part time workers.
However, some London councils have opposed the changes, warning that it could turn some residential properties into hotels and disrupt neighbourhoods.
Westminster City Council have asked for the length of short term lets permitted to be reduced from three months to one. Cabinet member for sustainability, Cllr Heather Acton, said: “This is a step in the right direction, but it doesn’t go nearly far enough. This is not about being bureaucratic – it is about making sure housing in central London does not become a chain of default hotels with rooms rented out at exorbitant prices to the highest bidder.”
Others claim sites like Airbnb have a negative effect on the rental market, reducing the number of long-term homes available for locals, and pushing up rents in the process.
Airbnb has already faced legal battles in many cities around the world, with authorities putting increasing pressure on the site to ensure that hosts comply with local laws, as well as paying the correct taxes.

"Berlin's government legislates against Airbnb" (E Lisboa? Nada faz!)

Berlin's government legislates against Airbnb Owners can no longer rent whole properties to tourists, as officals blame  websites including Airbnb, Wimdu and 9Flats for driving up rents

Berlin began restricting private property rentals through Airbnb and similar online platforms on Sunday, threatening hefty fines in an attempt to keep housing affordable for local people.

Authorities in the German capital fear the trend for people to let apartments to tourists through sites such as Airbnb, Wimdu and 9Flats is cutting into a limited property supply and driving up rents.
A new law – Zweckentfremdungsverbot – has been described by Andreas Geisel, Berlin’s head of urban development, as “a necessary and sensible instrument against the housing shortage in Berlin … I am absolutely determined to return such misappropriated apartments to the people of Berlin and to newcomers”.
Rents in Berlin rose 56% between 2009 and 2014 but are low compared with other major European cities at about €10 (£8) a square metre this year.
As Berlin has become one of Europe’s top travel destinations, with 30.2m overnight stays last year, the Airbnb trend has affected the local hotel industry. According to research company GBI, the private online bookings represent a “parallel market of an additional 6.1m” overnight stays a year.
The law was passed in 2014 but gave a two-year transition period that ended on Saturday, when owners became limited to renting only rooms via such sites, not entire flats or houses. Offenders can face fines of up to €100,000.
The city has appealed to the “civic spirit” of residents, asking them to anonymously report suspected misuse online.
Tim Boening, 41, who rents out a loft in the trendy Kreuzberg district, said he was not shocked by the law, given practices he had seen. He cited “the nice couple with two small apartments who move in together to a bigger place and keep the two apartments to rent them out on Airbnb … I don’t think that’s good – it should be stopped.”
But a 48-year-old woman who did not want to give her name expressed fury about the change, having rented out four apartments near the city centre via Airbnb. She claimed the city was making Berliners pay for its failed housing policy while serving the needs of the hotel industry.
She was especially angry about the request to inform on offenders, saying that “in Germany, of all places, maybe we should reconsider this kind of thing”.
Airbnb Germany said: “Berliners want clear and simple rules for home sharing, so they can continue to share their own homes with guests. We will continue to encourage Berlin policymakers to listen to their citizens and to follow the example of other big cities such as Paris, London, Amsterdam or Hamburg and create new, clear rules for normal people who are sharing their own homes.”
Wimdu has filed a lawsuit, arguing the law breaches the constitution of Berlin. The owners of 9Flats told the daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung: “We face a law in Berlin that would drive us into bankruptcy.”
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/may/01/berlin-authorities-taking-stand-against-airbnb-rental-boom

Saturday, April 2, 2016

POSTAL DA BAIXA: Rua dos Condes de Monsanto




















Os grandes dispositivos de publicidade luminosos, ilegais, que se observam nesta imagem foram, finalmente, retirados no mês passado.

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

NY TIMES: «Tuk-tuks, uma praga como a dos pombos»




LISBON — Residents of this port city of faded beauty and ornately tiled facades have welcomed a surge of tourists in recent years who have helped turn around its economic slide.

But the foreign visitors, they will tell you, have also come with their share of trade-offs. Rapid redevelopment, spurred by tax breaks granted to foreign property buyers, has driven up rents and widened disparities. Streets are more crowded, the traffic worse.
And then, there is the tuk-tuk.

In just a couple of years, about 300 of the motorized, three-wheel vehicles have swarmed Lisbon’s narrow cobblestone streets, offering tourists an alternate way of navigating this hilly city, famous, too, for its network of trams and funiculars.
While visitors have flocked to the tuk-tuk, those who live in this city of about 550,000 have begun to fume about pollution, noisier streets and a verging “quality of living problem,” according to Miguel Gaspar, a Portuguese transportation consultant.
“The growth of the tuk-tuks has been such that they’re even being sold to tourists as something typical of Lisbon, which really isn’t true,” he said. “They’re now like pigeons, just everywhere.” (in NY Times, 26 Outubro 2015)

Para ler o artigo completo:

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/10/27/world/europe/tuk-tuks-lisbon-portugal.html?referer=&_r=0

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

RUA AUGUSTA: «Is this enough Mr. Mayor?»































O Circo, o Carnaval, o Reino do Plástico e o Império do Luxo Barato em que a Rua Augusta se está a transformar é um espectáculo degradante... Este é talvez o arruamento de Lisboa onde os sépticos podem mais facilmente verificar a trágica erosão da cidade histórica que sempre acontece quando se deixa o Turismo à Solta. Porque quando uma Câmara Municipal, e Governo(s), se mostram incapazes de ter uma ideia de Turismo e do seu respectivo planeamento, o desastre é inevitável. Estamos a caminhar para um cenário irreversível. Infelizmente muitos de nós - e dos nossos políticos - ainda olham para o Turismo como uma actividade meramente económica, do interesse do Ministério da Economia, e não como coisa cultural como poderia ser. 

Monday, March 14, 2016

Há uma nova «Fábrica de Mentiras» em Lisboa








Há uma nova fábrica de mentiras em Lisboa para o turista engolir!

Desta vez a fabricação recebeu o nome de FÁBRICA DA NATA e está em plena Praça dos Restauradores!

Tudo parece indicar que se trata de mais um projecto dos mesmos artistas de Circo dos "pastéis de bacalhau com queijo" na Baixa - ou serão outros artistas que estão a competir com o "Circo & Carnaval" da Rua Augusta?

O cenário criado é mais uma vez do tipo "luxo barato & antiguidade inventada".

No tecto, à maneira decorativa e para entreter turista, estão sempre a circular tabuleiros metálicos iguais aos que vão ao forno com pastéis de nata...

O chão é de mosaicos hidráulicos falsos e os balcões e outros elementos numa infeliz imitação do cobre! E ainda há oliveiras de plástico a decorar!

Mas logo na entrada está um cozinheiro a representar empenhadamente o seu papel do "faz de conta" que os pasteis de nata são feitos em panela antiga de cobre, à mão e um a um... Cada vez mais a Baixa se consagra como uma verdadeira, tourist trap. Lisboa já não tem vergonha? Ninguém se indigna com todas estas mentiras que a nossa cidade vomita diariamente?

Friday, March 4, 2016

Hotel na Rua 1º de Dezembro com reclamo ilegal desde 5 de Março de 2015


No dia 5 de Março de 2015 foi instalado este reclame luminoso de grandes dimensões de um novo Hotel na Rua 1º de Dezembro 84 a 100 (com frente também para a Praça D. Pedro IV 54 a 61); a 30 de Abril de 2015 fomos informados oficialmente pela DGPC que o referido dispositivo de publicidade era de natureza ilegal pois não recebeu o parecer obrigatório e vinculativo da tutela da Cultura e que por esse motivo foi solicitado à CML explicações sobre o seu licenciamento.

Passado exactamente 1 ano, continua instalado na fachada o referido dispositivo de publicidade, que foi fotografado no dia da sua instalação a 5 de Março de 2015 (teve direito a escolta da Polícia Municipal!), conforme imagens que enviámos à DGPC nessa data exacta.

Porque ficam nos locais estes dispositivos ilegais durante anos apesar das denúncias e da confirmação da sua ilegalidade e evidente impacto negativo nos bens culturais classificados? Vai ser necessário que o jornalista ANtónio Cerejo traga mais este caso para a praça pública para que a CML e DGPC façam cumprir a Lei do Património?

É pois com grande preocupação que assistimos à proliferação de dispositivos de publicidade instalados de forma descuidada, sobre vãos, guardas de varandas, etc. um pouco por toda a Baixa Pombalina e com o aparente desinteresse da CML.

Sunday, February 21, 2016

Mais um Quiosque para Turista na Baixa...


O emblemático Quiosque na Praça dos Restauradores já não vende jornais, revistas, e a venda de bilhetes para espectáculos asumidamente secundarizada. Os sintomas bem visíveis nas imagens provam que sofreu da metamorfose do costume - já está formatada ao serviço dessa indústria milagrosa chamada Turismo. A cidade como prostituta de uma ideia de turista? Mas que turista é este que Lisboa tão cegamente persegue?

Monday, February 15, 2016

LARGO DO CARMO: Largo das Esplanadas?



Se no passado recente tinhamos que protestar, e lutar, pelo uso abusivo dos largos e praças da cidade como parques de estacionamento, agora o "novo carro" da cidade parecem ser as esplanadas! No futuro, e para nos sentarmos num largo - espaço público - vai ser obrigatório pagar um café ou bebida? É o que parece neste Largo do Carmo assim como no vizinho Largo Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro que se livrou de todo o estacionamento apenas para ser imediatamente invadido de esplanadas numa forma questionável de apropriação do espaço público por privados (cafés, restaurantes). Em Barcelona já há movimentos de moradores a protestar por esta "venda" do espaço das suas ruas aos estabelecimentos da restauração, tudo em nome desse negócio-devorador das cidades de hoje: TURISMO.